ON AVERAGE 40 LITRES OF MAPLE WATER ARE REQUIRED TO PRODUCE ONE LITRE OF MAPLE SYRUP

The sugar maple changes the starch it takes on as it grows into sugar. The sugar mixes with the water absorbed by the maple’s roots and the maple water becomes slightly sweet. In Spring, when temperatures rise, the water in the trunk and roots expands and raises the tree’s internal pressure. By alternating cold nights, when the temperature is below zero, and days when the temperature is above zero, promotes the flow of maple water, which is then carried in tubes to the sugar shack. Here there is an evaporator in which maple water is transformed to maple syrup by evaporation. On average, it takes 40 litres of maple water to produce one litre of syrup.

The production equipment – pumping station, underground pipeline for the water to avoid contamination by the air, electrical circuit, computer system, osmosis, evaporator and filtration system for the syrup are modern and effective. The collected sap is retained in suitable reservoirs to be concentrated by reverse osmosis. Next, the concentrated sap is evaporated in a temperature-controlled system.

This stage of the process is extremely delicate for birch syrup (yellow birch). The impressive technical know-how of Érablière Escuminac has led to the development of a stable method, giving a superior yield, to boil this precious nectar without spillage or caramelisation. The birch sap (yellow birch) must boil for a long time, on a low heat, whereas maple sap is boiled at a higher heat for a shorter period. The syrups obtained in this way are then collected and stored in barrels.

160 litres of birch (yellow birch) sap are needed to produce one litre of this precious syrup, making it a rare and exceptional product (production limited to 1500 litres a year).

* source http://www.siropderable.ca
* source Érablière Escuminac